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School of Chemical Sciences

Chemistry, as a physical science, is traditionally focussed on the study of the composition, properties, and reactivity of matter. Increasing interaction is happening between chemistry and other sciences, most notably the biological sciences, but also other fields such as mathematics, engineering and computing, and material sciences.  As chemistry bridges many of the other natural sciences, research in chemistry plays a pivotal role in a sustainable and prosperous future for us all. For instance, our School's research is concerned with a broad range of societal challenges including effective drug design is to combat disease, converting waste products into energy, and designing next-generation sensing technologies for improved decision-making about our health and our environmental management.

Currently we have eighteen academics in our School with research interests spanning the breadth of chemistry, including reasearch in the areas of biological, environmental, inorganic, organic, materails, analytical, and physical chemistry.  The School works collaboratively in various ways, both within the School and as well more broadly with other Schools across the University. The School also plays a major role in several of DCU's Research Centres.

For a comprehensive overview of our academic staff research interests, please select from our research themes below:

 Chemical Biology and Imaging 

Tia Keyes (Full Professor)


Tia Keyes is Full Professor of physical chemistry at the School of Chemical Sciences, where she has been a member of academic staff since 2002. Her research interests lie in the fields of molecular spectroscopy & photophysics and in supramolecular & interfacial chemistry. She is particularly interested in applications of these fields to biological problems, including cell imaging/environmental mapping, cell capture, sensing and membrane mimetics. Tia’s research team are based between the School of Chemical Sciences and the National Biophotonics and Imaging Platform Ireland (NBIPI) www.nbipireland.ie/ which is housed within The National Centre for Sensor Research www.ncsr.ie Tia is an academic member of The Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (www.bdi.ie) and currently co-node leader (Britain and Ireland) on the Biophotonics4life consortium (http://www.biophotonicsworld.org. Tia is also currently coordinator of the National Biophotonics and Imaging Platform at DCU. Collaborators: Prof. Robert Forster, DCU, Prof. Alan M. Bond, Monash University, Australia, Dr Grace Morgan, UCD, Dr. James Rice, UCD. Dr. Tim McCormack, DKIT, Prof. Tony Wedd, University of Melbourne, Australia, Prof Niamh Moran RCSI, Dr Marc Devocelle, RCSI, Prof L Cronin, Univ Glasgow, UK, Prof. Mario Reuben, Univ. of Karlsruhe, Prof Conor Long, DCU, Prof Barry Lentz, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Prof Emmanuel Iwuoha, Univ. of Western Cape, Prof Vickie McKee, Univ of Loughborough, Prof Jane Nelson.

Research Centres: NBIPI; NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

 Andrew Kellett (Assistant Professor)

Andrew Kellett is principle investigator and Associate Professor of medicinal inorganic chemistry in the School of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University, Ireland. His group are based at the National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology (NICB) and Nano-Bioanalytical Research Facility (NRF) and focus on discovery of metallodrug-nucleic acid interactions for biochemical and therapeutic application. He is coordinator of the Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (ITN) Click Gene, the Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) Career Development Award Polynuclear Platinum (II) Biomaterials (PPtBio) for Antisense Therapeutic Application and Detection of Human Genetic Disease, and his lab is also supported by the Irish Research Council and the Science Foundation Ireland funded Synthesis and Solid-State Pharmaceutical Centre. He completed his B.Sc. (1st Class) in chemistry from NUI Maynooth, received his Ph.D. in 2007 under the guidance of Prof. M. Devereux at the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) and Dr. Maureen Walsh at the Institute of Technology Tallaght, Dublin (ITTD). He was then appointed as A.F. Graves Postdoctoral Fellow at the Focas Research Institute until 2011 and thereafter joined the School of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University.

Research Centres: NICB, NRF

Recent publications:

 

Nessan Kerrigan (Assistant Professor)

Dr. Kerrigan obtained his B.Sc. in Chemistry from University College Dublin (1992-1996).  He then completed his Ph.D. in Chemistry at University College Dublin (1996-2000) under the direction of Professor Declan G. Gilheany.  He spent a year in industry working as a process development chemist for Merck in Ballydine before carrying out postdoctoral research at the University of Glasgow (2002-2004) with Professor David J. Procter.  He carried out further postdoctoral research at the University of Pittsburgh (2004-2006) with Prof. Scott G. Nelson.  In 2006 Dr. Kerrigan began his independent research career at Oakland University in Michigan.  In August 2017, Dr. Kerrigan returned to Ireland to take up a position as Lecturer in the School of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University.  The Kerrigan group carries out research in the area of synthetic organic chemistry.  Most of the group’s work is of the basic/fundamental chemistry research kind and is focused on the development of new efficient methods for the construction of biologically interesting and pharmaceutically important organic molecules. 

 

Rational Design and Modelling

Anthony Reilly (Assistant Professor)


Anthony Reilly's research is in the area of modelling and understanding the structure and properties of molecular materials. Of particular interest is understanding polymorphism and solid-form landscapes of active pharmaceutical ingredients, which are both key to understanding risks and opportunities during drug product development.  The elastic and mechanical response of molecular crystals is another area of active research. Techniques being applied and developed include first-principles calculations, including many-body vdW models, empirical-potential simulations and structural informatics based on the Cambridge Structural Database.

Research Centres: None

Recent Publications:

Analytical Chemistry 

Kieran Nolan (Head of School and Associate Professor)


Kieran Nolan completed his PhD in 1996 at York University (Toronto, Canada) under the supervision of Professor Clifford Leznoff.  After completing his PhD Kieran worked both as a research chemist in the pharmaceutical industry in Toronto (Novopharm Lmt.) and then as a formulation chemist in the development of new polymer laminates in Toronto/South Carolina. In 1998 Kieran came to Ireland and joined Professor Dermot Diamond’s research group in the NCSR. In 2001 Kieran was appointed Lecturer in the School of Chemical Sciences. In 2012 Kieran became a Senior Lecturer and was then appointed Head of School of Chemical Sciences in 2014.

Kieran Nolan’s research group has been intensively involved in the area of both synthetic chemistry and the environmental sciences since its inception in 2001. In the past, Dr Nolan’s group has specialised in the development of new chemoreceptors for application in environmental sensing and extraction of heavy metals from waste streams. More recently, his group has evolved into four streams centred around macrocycle chemistry:

1) The design and preparation of both carbonaceous and dye-TiO2 composites for application in the removal of pollutants from industrial and domestic waste water

2) Rational drug design – development of potassium channel inhibitors - targeting multiple sclerosis

3) Development of new photosensitisers and chemoreceptors for application in sensors/heavy metal extraction technologies and medicinal chemistry.

4) Green synthetic technologies, with particular emphasis on the development of new energy efficient continuous flow photochemical reactors for application in synthesis and pollutant remediation

Present Commercial Collaborations: Astellas, ABP, Veolia, Dr Reddy's and TE Labs.

Research Centres: NCSR, DCU Water Institute, ICNT, APT

Recent publications:

 

 

Apryll Stalcup (Full Professor)


Apryll Stalcup is Full Professor of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University.  She received a BS in Chemistry from California State University-Sacramento (1979) and her PhD from Georgetown University in Washington, DC (1988).  She was a Co-op Fellow at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland (1985-1988).  After a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Missouri-Rolla, she moved to the University of Hawaii-Manoa in 1990.  In 1996, she moved to the University of Cincinnati and promoted to Full Professor in 2001.  She moved to Dublin City University In 2012 Dr. Stalcup’s research interests are in separation science.  Her group pioneered the use sulfated-β-cyclodextrin, heparin and quinine as chiral additives in capillary electrophoresis.  They have been very active in the application of surface-confined ionic liquids (SCIL) and demonstrated their wide application range (e.g., reversed phase, normal phase, ion exchange and ion exclusion). 

In 2011, she was awarded the Cincinnati Chemist of the Year by the Cincinnati Section of the American Chemical Society.  In 2015, she received the American Micro chemical Society A. A. Benedetti-Pichler Award.  Dr. Stalcup is the author of over 100 publications, reviews, book chapters and one patent.  She has served as the thesis/dissertation advisor or mentor to 32 postgraduate and Postdoctoral Fellows.  She is a Fellow of the Institute of Chemistry of Ireland, the Royal Society of Chemistry, a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Association of the Advancement of Science and Sigma Xi. She currently serves on the Royal Society of Chemistry Analytical Division Council, is a Contributing Editor for Trends in Analytical Chemistry and serves on the Editorial Board for Journal of Liquid Chromatography and Related Techniques. She is the Co-Chair (with Prof. Jeremy Glennon, University College Cork) of the 31st International Symposium on Chromatography in 2016.

Research Centres: NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Dermot Diamond (Full Professor)

Dermot Diamond received his Ph.D. and D.Sc. from Queen's University Belfast (Chemical Sensors, 1987, Internet Scale Sensing, 2002), and was Vice president for Research at Dublin City University (DCU), Ireland (2002-2004).

He has published over 180 peer reviewed papers in international science journals, is a named inventor in 13 patents, and is co-author and editor of three books, 'Spreadsheet Applications in Chemistry using Microsoft Excel' (1997) and ‘Principles of Chemical and Biological Sensors’, (1998) both published by Wiley, and ‘Smart NanoTextiles’, Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Volume 20, 2006.

Professor Diamond is currently director of the National Centre for Sensor Research at DCU (www.ncsr.ie) and a Principal Investigator with the Adaptive Information Cluster (AIC), a major research initiative in the area of wireless sensor networks founded by Science Foundation Ireland (see www.adaptiveinformation.ie). He was formerly the vice-president for research at DCU (2002-2005). He is a member of the editorial advisory board of the international journal ‘Talanta’. In 2002 he was awarded the inaugural silver medal for Sensor Research by the Royal Society of Chemistry, London, and in 2008 he was received the DCU President’s Research award. Details of his research can be found at http://www.dcu.ie/chemistry/asg/.

His research interests are broad, ranging from molecular recognition, host-guest chemistry, ligand design and synthesis, electrochemical and optical chemical sensors and biosensors, lab-on-a-chip, sensor applications in environmental, clinical, food quality and process monitoring, development of fully autonomous sensing devices, wireless sensors and sensor networks. He is particularly interested in the using analytical devices and sensors as information providers for wireless networked systems i.e. building a continuum between the digital and molecular worlds.

Research Centres: NCSR, INSIGHT

Recent publications:

 

 

Fiona Regan (Full Professor, Director of DCU Water Institute)


Fiona Regan is Professor in Chemistry at Dublin City University and Director of the DCU Water Institute. Fiona studied Environmental Science and Technology and later completed a PhD in analytical chemisty in 1994. Following postdoctoral research in optical sensing in DCU, in 1996 she took up a lecturing position at Limerick Institute of Technology. In 2002 Fiona joined the School of Chemical Sciences as a lecturer in analytical chemistry, in 2008 she became senior lecturer and in 2009 became the Beaufort Principal Investigator in Marine and Environmental Sensing.

Fiona’s research focuses on environmental monitoring and she has special interest in priority and emerging contaminants as well as the establishment of decision support tools for environmental monitoring using novel technologies and data management tools. Her work includes the areas of separations and sensors (including microfluidics), materials for sensing and antifouling applications on aquatic deployed systems.

Research Centres: DCU Water Institute, NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Robert Forster (Full Professor, Director of the National Centre for Sensor Research)

Robert Forster holds the Chair of Physical Chemistry within the School of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University and is the Director of the strategically important National Centre for Sensor research.  He is the author/co-author of more than 230 manuscripts and reviews, supervised more than 35 PhD and M.Sc. students to completion, mentored more than 40 Post-Doctoral Fellows and has been a Visiting Scientist to the California Institute of Technology and the University of California at Berkeley.  He has served as DCU Dean of Research and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Science and Health with responsibility for research.  He has received the President’s Research Award and was the first Irish based electrochemist to present an invited talk at the Gordon Research Conference on Electrochemistry.  He has contributed invited articles to more than eight Festschrift Issues celebrating the accomplishments of distinguished international scientists.  He is a member of the Editorial Board of Electrochemical Communications (http://www.journals.elsevier.com/electrochemistry-communications ). He has been deeply involved in major national research programmes including the establishment of the National Centre for Sensor Research, the Biomedical Diagnostics Centre and the NanoBioAnalytical Research Facility at DCU.

Research Centres: NCSR; NRF

Recent publications:                  

 

 

Aoife Morrin (Associate Professor)


Dr. Morrin works in the field of electroanalytical device development for environmental and biomedical sensing applications and has published 50 research papers and has several book chapters in fields ranging from electrochemical biosensing to novel nanomaterials.

She is an academic member of the National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR) and a funded investigator with INSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics. Her expertise is in developing and studying functional (and stimuli-responsive) materials with improved performances using electrochemical techniques. Integration of these materials into microfluidic platforms for sensor and analytical device development is also an activity in her research group.

Dr Morrin currently holds a Career Development Award from SFI developing research in the area of epidermal sensing and wearable where she is interested in developing novel analytical approaches to monitoring the skin organ from a health perspective. Dr. Morrin has experience in managing projects as Principle Investigator in a number of national and international grants (over €2 million in total) and has good industrial links, for example through the IRC-employment-based postgraduate programme scheme with T.E. laboratories. She also has an ongoing contract research relationship with Abbott Diagnostics® (Ireland).

Research centres: NCSRINSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics, Water Institute

Recent publications:

 


Brian Kelleher (Associate Professor)


Brian Kelleher Lecturer, School of Chemical Sciences, DCU. Feb. 2004 to July 2005; Postdoc. With Dr Andre Simpson, Dept. of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto. Set-up and method development of advanced analytical hyphenated methods: Liquid Chromatography (LC) - Mass Spectroscopy (MS)-Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). July 2002- Feb. 2004; Postdoctoral Researcher with Prof. William Kingery, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University. Catalytic activity of enzymes immobilised on organo-minerals. Characterisation of organic/inorganic component of deep-sea sediments associated with gas hydrates. Feb. 2001-July 2002; Project Manager for an EPA (Ireland) funded research project that resulted in a successful demonstration of the fluidised bed combustion of animal waste to produce heat and electricity. 1997-2001: PhD. Dr Tom O'Dwyer, development of sorbents for organic compounds, University of Limerick.

Research Centres: NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Blánaid White (Assistant Professor)


Dr. Whites research interests focus on the development of intelligent analysis tools and the application of analytical chemistry for the investigation of chemical and biochemical processes in the world around us.

A primary focus of her research is the elucidation of molecular mechanisms which initiate and propagate oxidative stress, particularly that which leads to DNA damage. This type of damage has been linked to mutagenesis, neurological disease and aging, and understanding the underlying mechanisms has the potential to enable us to develop tailored therapies to combat these diseases.

A further research focus is the development of analytical platforms. She coordinates the Interreg-funded project  Monitool , which seeks to develop new tools for monitoring the chemical status in transitional and coastal waters under the Water Framework Directive.

Dr. White also researches unique bioactive and nutrition profiles in Irish food. She is currently exploring the bioactive profiles for Irish honeys from across the island, investigating both honeybee and bumblebee honey and is a founding member of the Irish Bee and Pesticide Network.

Dr. White hasve worked extensively with industry, with previous research projects in collaboration with Allergan Ltd., Pfizer Ltd. and Proctor and Gamble Ltd. My Her group has ongoing research projects with Alltech (Ireland) in the area of oxidative DNA damage.

Research Centres: NCSR, DCU Water Institute

Recent publications:

 


Mercedes Vasquez (Assistant Professor)


Mercedes Vázquez is Assistant Professor in Analytical Chemistry at the School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University (DCU), since 2014. She is also a principal investigator at the National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), DCU. She received her MSc in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Oviedo (Spain) in 1998. In 1999, she joined the Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry at Åbo Akademi University (Turku, Finland) as an ERASMUS exchange student, where she continued till obtaining her PhD from Åbo Akademi in 2005. During this period, she worked on the development of potentiometric ion sensors based on conducting polymers for various applications such as chemical process control and clinical analysis. In 2006, she took up a postdoctoral position within the Centre for Bioanalytical Sciences (CBAS) at DCU, where she primarily focused on the development of analytical methods and technologies for the rapid screening of very complex media in biopharmaceutical processes. She then joined the Irish Separation Science Cluster (ISSC), DCU, in 2009, where she coordinated a research program focused on the development of novel microfluidic platforms for a wide range of (bio)analytical applications, including biotechnology and environmental analysis.

Research Centres: NCSR, APT

Recent publications:

 



 

 


Materials Chemistry

Kieran Nolan (Head of School and Associate Professor)


Kieran Nolan completed his PhD in 1996 at York University (Toronto, Canada) under the supervision of Professor Clifford Leznoff.  After completing his PhD Kieran worked both as a research chemist in the pharmaceutical industry in Toronto (Novopharm Lmt.) and then as a formulation chemist in the development of new polymer laminates in Toronto/South Carolina. In 1998 Kieran came to Ireland and joined Professor Dermot Diamond’s research group in the NCSR. In 2001 Kieran was appointed Lecturer in the School of Chemical Sciences. In 2012 Kieran became a Senior Lecturer and was then appointed Head of School of Chemical Sciences in 2014.

Kieran Nolan’s research group has been intensively involved in the area of both synthetic chemistry and the environmental sciences since its inception in 2001. In the past, Dr Nolan’s group has specialised in the development of new chemoreceptors for application in environmental sensing and extraction of heavy metals from waste streams. More recently, his group has evolved into four streams centred around macrocycle chemistry:

1) The design and preparation of both carbonaceous and dye-TiO2 composites for application in the removal of pollutants from industrial and domestic waste water

2) Rational drug design – development of potassium channel inhibitors - targeting multiple sclerosis

3) Development of new photosensitisers and chemoreceptors for application in sensors/heavy metal extraction technologies and medicinal chemistry.

4) Green synthetic technologies, with particular emphasis on the development of new energy efficient continuous flow photochemical reactors for application in synthesis and pollutant remediation

Present Commercial Collaborations: Astellas, ABP, Veolia, Dr Reddy's and TE Labs.

Research Centres: NCSR, DCU Water Institute, ICNT, APT

Recent publications:

 

 

Tia Keyes (Full Professor)


Tia Keyes is Full Professor of physical chemistry at the School of Chemical Sciences, where she has been a member of academic staff since 2002. Her research interests lie in the fields of molecular spectroscopy & photophysics and in supramolecular & interfacial chemistry. She is particularly interested in applications of these fields to biological problems, including cell imaging/environmental mapping, cell capture, sensing and membrane mimetics. Tia’s research team are based between the School of Chemical Sciences and the National Biophotonics and Imaging Platform Ireland (NBIPI) www.nbipireland.ie/ which is housed within The National Centre for Sensor Research www.ncsr.ie Tia is an academic member of The Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (www.bdi.ie) and currently co-node leader (Britain and Ireland) on the Biophotonics4life consortium (http://www.biophotonicsworld.org. Tia is also currently coordinator of the National Biophotonics and Imaging Platform at DCU. Collaborators: Prof. Robert Forster, DCU, Prof. Alan M. Bond, Monash University, Australia, Dr Grace Morgan, UCD, Dr. James Rice, UCD. Dr. Tim McCormack, DKIT, Prof. Tony Wedd, University of Melbourne, Australia, Prof Niamh Moran RCSI, Dr Marc Devocelle, RCSI, Prof L Cronin, Univ Glasgow, UK, Prof. Mario Reuben, Univ. of Karlsruhe, Prof Conor Long, DCU, Prof Barry Lentz, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Prof Emmanuel Iwuoha, Univ. of Western Cape, Prof Vickie McKee, Univ of Loughborough, Prof Jane Nelson.

Research Centres: NBIPI; NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Apryll Stalcup (Full Professor)

Apryll Stalcup is Full Professor of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University.  She received a BS in Chemistry from California State University-Sacramento (1979) and her PhD from Georgetown University in Washington, DC (1988).  She was a Co-op Fellow at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland (1985-1988).  After a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Missouri-Rolla, she moved to the University of Hawaii-Manoa in 1990.  In 1996, she moved to the University of Cincinnati and promoted to Full Professor in 2001.  She moved to Dublin City University In 2012 Dr. Stalcup’s research interests are in separation science.  Her group pioneered the use sulfated-β-cyclodextrin, heparin and quinine as chiral additives in capillary electrophoresis.  They have been very active in the application of surface-confined ionic liquids (SCIL) and demonstrated their wide application range (e.g., reversed phase, normal phase, ion exchange and ion exclusion). 

In 2011, she was awarded the Cincinnati Chemist of the Year by the Cincinnati Section of the American Chemical Society.  In 2015, she received the American Micro chemical Society A. A. Benedetti-Pichler Award.  Dr. Stalcup is the author of over 100 publications, reviews, book chapters and one patent.  She has served as the thesis/dissertation advisor or mentor to 32 postgraduate and Postdoctoral Fellows.  She is a Fellow of the Institute of Chemistry of Ireland, the Royal Society of Chemistry, a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Association of the Advancement of Science and Sigma Xi. She currently serves on the Royal Society of Chemistry Analytical Division Council, is a Contributing Editor for Trends in Analytical Chemistry and serves on the Editorial Board for Journal of Liquid Chromatography and Related Techniques. She is the Co-Chair (with Prof. Jeremy Glennon, University College Cork) of the 31st International Symposium on Chromatography in 2016.

Research Centres: NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Fiona Regan (Full Professor, Director of DCU Water Institute)


Fiona Regan is Professor in Chemistry at Dublin City University and Director of the DCU Water Institute. Fiona studied Environmental Science and Technology and later completed a PhD in analytical chemisty in 1994. Following postdoctoral research in optical sensing in DCU, in 1996 she took up a lecturing position at Limerick Institute of Technology. In 2002 Fiona joined the School of Chemical Sciences as a lecturer in analytical chemistry, in 2008 she became senior lecturer and in 2009 became the Beaufort Principal Investigator in Marine and Environmental Sensing.

Fiona’s research focuses on environmental monitoring and she has special interest in priority and emerging contaminants as well as the establishment of decision support tools for environmental monitoring using novel technologies and data management tools. Her work includes the areas of separations and sensors (including microfluidics), materials for sensing and antifouling applications on aquatic deployed systems.

Research Centres: DCU Water Institute, NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Robert Forster (Full Professor, Director of the National Centre for Sensor Research)

Robert Forster holds the Chair of Physical Chemistry within the School of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University and is the Director of the strategically important National Centre for Sensor research.  He is the author/co-author of more than 230 manuscripts and reviews, supervised more than 35 PhD and M.Sc. students to completion, mentored more than 40 Post-Doctoral Fellows and has been a Visiting Scientist to the California Institute of Technology and the University of California at Berkeley.  He has served as DCU Dean of Research and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Science and Health with responsibility for research.  He has received the President’s Research Award and was the first Irish based electrochemist to present an invited talk at the Gordon Research Conference on Electrochemistry.  He has contributed invited articles to more than eight Festschrift Issues celebrating the accomplishments of distinguished international scientists.  He is a member of the Editorial Board of Electrochemical Communications (http://www.journals.elsevier.com/electrochemistry-communications ). He has been deeply involved in major national research programmes including the establishment of the National Centre for Sensor Research, the Biomedical Diagnostics Centre and the NanoBioAnalytical Research Facility at DCU.

Research Centres: NCSR; NRF

Recent publications:                  

 

 

Conor Long (Full Professor)

Organometallic research at Dublin City University is currently focused on the photochemical and kinetic properties of organometallic compounds. Our research is primarily based on a study of the reactivity of co-ordinatively unsaturated species and more recently on photinduced insertion processes. The reactive species formed photochemically are characterised from a mixture of kinetic and thermodynamic data utilising UV-vis. laser flash photolysis and matrix isolation techniques.

One particular area that we have become involved in recently, is the photochemistry of heteroaromatic metal carbonyl compounds of d 6 or d 7 metals. These systems tend to be extremely photolabile and exhibit a wavelength dependent photochemistry. For instance a photoinduced insertion into a C-Se bond has been observed recently.

More recently research within the group has extended to the development of theoretical models to describe organometallic compounds, at present we are using ab initio techniques (Gaussian 03). The ultimate aim of these calculations is to predict the photochemistry of the organometallic system and to understand the properties and behaviour of reactive fragments.

Recent publications:

 

 

Dermot Diamond (Full Professor)

Dermot Diamond received his Ph.D. and D.Sc. from Queen's University Belfast (Chemical Sensors, 1987, Internet Scale Sensing, 2002), and was Vice president for Research at Dublin City University (DCU), Ireland (2002-2004).

He has published over 180 peer reviewed papers in international science journals, is a named inventor in 13 patents, and is co-author and editor of three books, 'Spreadsheet Applications in Chemistry using Microsoft Excel' (1997) and ‘Principles of Chemical and Biological Sensors’, (1998) both published by Wiley, and ‘Smart NanoTextiles’, Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Volume 20, 2006.

Professor Diamond is currently director of the National Centre for Sensor Research at DCU (www.ncsr.ie) and a Principal Investigator with the Adaptive Information Cluster (AIC), a major research initiative in the area of wireless sensor networks founded by Science Foundation Ireland (see www.adaptiveinformation.ie). He was formerly the vice-president for research at DCU (2002-2005). He is a member of the editorial advisory board of the international journal ‘Talanta’. In 2002 he was awarded the inaugural silver medal for Sensor Research by the Royal Society of Chemistry, London, and in 2008 he was received the DCU President’s Research award. Details of his research can be found at http://www.dcu.ie/chemistry/asg/.

His research interests are broad, ranging from molecular recognition, host-guest chemistry, ligand design and synthesis, electrochemical and optical chemical sensors and biosensors, lab-on-a-chip, sensor applications in environmental, clinical, food quality and process monitoring, development of fully autonomous sensing devices, wireless sensors and sensor networks. He is particularly interested in the using analytical devices and sensors as information providers for wireless networked systems i.e. building a continuum between the digital and molecular worlds.

Research Centres: NCSR, INSIGHT

Recent publications:

 

 

Aoife Morrin (Associate Professor)


Dr. Morrin works in the field of electroanalytical device development for environmental and biomedical sensing applications and has published 50 research papers and has several book chapters in fields ranging from electrochemical biosensing to novel nanomaterials.

She is an academic member of the National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR) and a funded investigator with INSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics. Her expertise is in developing and studying functional (and stimuli-responsive) materials with improved performances using electrochemical techniques. Integration of these materials into microfluidic platforms for sensor and analytical device development is also an activity in her research group.

Dr Morrin currently holds a Career Development Award from SFI developing research in the area of epidermal sensing and wearable where she is interested in developing novel analytical approaches to monitoring the skin organ from a health perspective. Dr. Morrin has experience in managing projects as Principle Investigator in a number of national and international grants (over €2 million in total) and has good industrial links, for example through the IRC-employment-based postgraduate programme scheme with T.E. laboratories. She also has an ongoing contract research relationship with Abbott Diagnostics® (Ireland).

Research centres: NCSRINSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics, Water Institute

Recent publications:

 


Blánaid White (Assistant Professor)

Dr. Whites research interests focus on the development of intelligent analysis tools and the application of analytical chemistry for the investigation of chemical and biochemical processes in the world around us.

A primary focus of her research is the elucidation of molecular mechanisms which initiate and propagate oxidative stress, particularly that which leads to DNA damage. This type of damage has been linked to mutagenesis, neurological disease and aging, and understanding the underlying mechanisms has the potential to enable us to develop tailored therapies to combat these diseases.

A further research focus is the development of analytical platforms. She coordinates the Interreg-funded project  Monitool , which seeks to develop new tools for monitoring the chemical status in transitional and coastal waters under the Water Framework Directive.

Dr. White also researches unique bioactive and nutrition profiles in Irish food. She is currently exploring the bioactive profiles for Irish honeys from across the island, investigating both honeybee and bumblebee honey and is a founding member of the Irish Bee and Pesticide Network.

Dr. White hasve worked extensively with industry, with previous research projects in collaboration with Allergan Ltd., Pfizer Ltd. and Proctor and Gamble Ltd. My Her group has ongoing research projects with Alltech (Ireland) in the area of oxidative DNA damage.

Research Centres: NCSR, DCU Water Institute

Recent publications:

 



Emma Coyle (Assistant Professor)


Emma Coyle is an Assistant Professor in organic and medicinal chemistry in the School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University (DCU), since 2014.

Dr. Coyle received her BSc in Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences and PhD in Organic Photochemistry from DCU. She then joined the School of Chemistry in the University of Nottingham as a research fellow in the groups of Prof. Rob Stockman and Dr Ross Denton, in collaboration with Prof. Sean Rigby in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering. In 2011, she re-joined DCU as a postdoctoral researcher in the group of Dr Chris O’Brien in the National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR). Throughout these experiences she focused on research in organic synthesis, in particular development of novel methodologies or green routes to high-value molecules.

Research Centres: NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

John Gallagher (Assistant Professor)

Dr. John F. Gallagher – Assistant Professor in Inorganic Chemistry, Dublin City University. Ph.D. awarded by University College, Galway (NUIG) on 'Synthesis and Structure of derivatives of the [Re2Cl8]2- anion' and followed by postdoctoral research in small molecule crystallography and synthetic chemistry at the University of Guelph, Canada and research in organometallic chemistry at Cambridge University, U.K. Currently 199+ peer-reviewed chemistry and structural science papers have been published since 1989 (cited > 3200 times) and h-index of 28. Co-Editor of Acta Crystallographica Section C, (2000-2012) and Co-Editor of Acta Crystallographica Section E in 2011-2014, http://www.iucr.org/ Overall 1000+ international publications reviewed/edited (since 2000) for IUCr, RSC and ACS journals, primarily as a Co-Editor and independent reviewer. DORAS - The DCU Institutional Repository for recent IUCr papers is at http://doras.dcu.ie/view/people/Gallagher,_John_F=2E.html

Current research interests include synthesis and structural systematics of benzamides, carbamates and imides as well as macrocyclic imide synthesis of trezimides and tennimides. Recent papers have included studies on halogen bonding and the importance of weak interactions in influencing crystal structure formation.

Recent publications:

 

 

Mary Pryce (Associate Professor)

BSc. degree from DCU in 1991. A PhD (1991-1994) was subsequently obtained in organometallic photochemistry. Post doctoral studies were carried out during 1995 and 1996 at the University of Milan with Prof. Stefano Maiorana before rejoining the School of Chemical Sciences at DCU in 1997 as a Lecturer.

 Affiliated groups: NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Mercedes Vasquez (Assistant Professor)


Mercedes Vázquez is Assistant Professor in Analytical Chemistry at the School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University (DCU), since 2014. She is also a principal investigator at the National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), DCU. She received her MSc in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Oviedo (Spain) in 1998. In 1999, she joined the Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry at Åbo Akademi University (Turku, Finland) as an ERASMUS exchange student, where she continued till obtaining her PhD from Åbo Akademi in 2005. During this period, she worked on the development of potentiometric ion sensors based on conducting polymers for various applications such as chemical process control and clinical analysis. In 2006, she took up a postdoctoral position within the Centre for Bioanalytical Sciences (CBAS) at DCU, where she primarily focused on the development of analytical methods and technologies for the rapid screening of very complex media in biopharmaceutical processes. She then joined the Irish Separation Science Cluster (ISSC), DCU, in 2009, where she coordinated a research program focused on the development of novel microfluidic platforms for a wide range of (bio)analytical applications, including biotechnology and environmental analysis.

Research Centres: NCSR, APT

Recent publications:

 

 

Peter Kenny (Assistant Professor)

B. Sc.(Hons), Chemistry, University College Dublin 1979. M. Sc., Chemistry, University College Dublin 1980. Ph. D., Chemistry, University College Dublin 1984.

 

 

James Walsh (SFI Starting Investigator)

Jamie is a materials scientist with extensive expertise with materials for energy conversion. His research interests include small molecule photo- and electrocatalytic transformations for solar fuel synthesis (CO2 reduction and water splitting), 2D materials, polymers, polyoxometalates and in-situ analysis using spectroelectrochemistry.

After a BSc and PhD in DCU, Jamie undertook postdoctoral positions at the Queen's University, Belfast, and the University of Liverpool. In October 2016 Jamie returned to DCU to establish his independent research group when made PI of a highly prestigious SFI SIRG fellowship.

Jamie has published multiple articles in high quality peer reviewed journals, delivered presentations at national and international conferences, and has reviewed extensively for the RSC, ACS and NPG. He is a member of the RSC and the ISE.

Oct 2016 - present: SFI SIRG fellow, DCU, CO2 reduction/ionic liquids/2D materials

June 2013 - Sept 2016: Postdoc, UoL, CO2 reduction/electrocatalysis/energy generation in soft materials

April 2013 - April 2014: Postdoc, QUB, photochemical/photoelectrochemical water splitting

July 2011 - April 2012: Postdoc, DCU, biospectroscopy

Oct 2007 - June 2011: PhD, DCU, physical chemistry/inorganic chemistry/polyoxometalates/dye photochemistry

Sept 2003 - June 2007: BSc 1.1 Hons, Chemical & Pharmaceutical Sciences, DCU

 

Research Centres: NCSR

Recent publications:

Photochemical CO2 reduction using structurally controlled g-C3N4

Controlling Visible Light Driven Photoconductivity in Self-Assembled Perylene Bisimide Structures

A highly active nickel electrocatalyst shows excellent selectivity for CO2 reduction in acidic media

 

Nessan Kerrigan (Assistant Professor)

Dr. Kerrigan obtained his B.Sc. in Chemistry from University College Dublin (1992-1996).  He then completed his Ph.D. in Chemistry at University College Dublin (1996-2000) under the direction of Professor Declan G. Gilheany.  He spent a year in industry working as a process development chemist for Merck in Ballydine before carrying out postdoctoral research at the University of Glasgow (2002-2004) with Professor David J. Procter.  He carried out further postdoctoral research at the University of Pittsburgh (2004-2006) with Prof. Scott G. Nelson.  In 2006 Dr. Kerrigan began his independent research career at Oakland University in Michigan.  In August 2017, Dr. Kerrigan returned to Ireland to take up a position as Lecturer in the School of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University.  The Kerrigan group carries out research in the area of synthetic organic chemistry.  Most of the group’s work is of the basic/fundamental chemistry research kind and is focused on the development of new efficient methods for the construction of biologically interesting and pharmaceutically important organic molecules.


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


Environmental and Sustainable Chemistry

Kieran Nolan (Head of School and Associate Professor)


Kieran Nolan completed his PhD in 1996 at York University (Toronto, Canada) under the supervision of Professor Clifford Leznoff.  After completing his PhD Kieran worked both as a research chemist in the pharmaceutical industry in Toronto (Novopharm Lmt.) and then as a formulation chemist in the development of new polymer laminates in Toronto/South Carolina. In 1998 Kieran came to Ireland and joined Professor Dermot Diamond’s research group in the NCSR. In 2001 Kieran was appointed Lecturer in the School of Chemical Sciences. In 2012 Kieran became a Senior Lecturer and was then appointed Head of School of Chemical Sciences in 2014.

Kieran Nolan’s research group has been intensively involved in the area of both synthetic chemistry and the environmental sciences since its inception in 2001. In the past, Dr Nolan’s group has specialised in the development of new chemoreceptors for application in environmental sensing and extraction of heavy metals from waste streams. More recently, his group has evolved into four streams centred around macrocycle chemistry:

1) The design and preparation of both carbonaceous and dye-TiO2 composites for application in the removal of pollutants from industrial and domestic waste water

2) Rational drug design – development of potassium channel inhibitors - targeting multiple sclerosis

3) Development of new photosensitisers and chemoreceptors for application in sensors/heavy metal extraction technologies and medicinal chemistry.

4) Green synthetic technologies, with particular emphasis on the development of new energy efficient continuous flow photochemical reactors for application in synthesis and pollutant remediation

Present Commercial Collaborations: Astellas, ABP, Veolia, Dr Reddy's and TE Labs.

Research Centres: NCSR, DCU Water Institute, ICNT, APT

Recent publications:

 

 

Fiona Regan (Full Professor, Director of DCU Water Insititute)


Fiona Regan is Professor in Chemistry at Dublin City University and Director of the DCU Water Institute. Fiona studied Environmental Science and Technology and later completed a PhD in analytical chemisty in 1994. Following postdoctoral research in optical sensing in DCU, in 1996 she took up a lecturing position at Limerick Institute of Technology. In 2002 Fiona joined the School of Chemical Sciences as a lecturer in analytical chemistry, in 2008 she became senior lecturer and in 2009 became the Beaufort Principal Investigator in Marine and Environmental Sensing.

Fiona’s research focuses on environmental monitoring and she has special interest in priority and emerging contaminants as well as the establishment of decision support tools for environmental monitoring using novel technologies and data management tools. Her work includes the areas of separations and sensors (including microfluidics), materials for sensing and antifouling applications on aquatic deployed systems.

Research Centres: DCU Water Institute, NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Dermot Diamond (Full Professor)

Dermot Diamond received his Ph.D. and D.Sc. from Queen's University Belfast (Chemical Sensors, 1987, Internet Scale Sensing, 2002), and was Vice president for Research at Dublin City University (DCU), Ireland (2002-2004).

He has published over 180 peer reviewed papers in international science journals, is a named inventor in 13 patents, and is co-author and editor of three books, 'Spreadsheet Applications in Chemistry using Microsoft Excel' (1997) and ‘Principles of Chemical and Biological Sensors’, (1998) both published by Wiley, and ‘Smart NanoTextiles’, Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Volume 20, 2006.

Professor Diamond is currently director of the National Centre for Sensor Research at DCU (www.ncsr.ie) and a Principal Investigator with the Adaptive Information Cluster (AIC), a major research initiative in the area of wireless sensor networks founded by Science Foundation Ireland (see www.adaptiveinformation.ie). He was formerly the vice-president for research at DCU (2002-2005). He is a member of the editorial advisory board of the international journal ‘Talanta’. In 2002 he was awarded the inaugural silver medal for Sensor Research by the Royal Society of Chemistry, London, and in 2008 he was received the DCU President’s Research award. Details of his research can be found at http://www.dcu.ie/chemistry/asg/.

His research interests are broad, ranging from molecular recognition, host-guest chemistry, ligand design and synthesis, electrochemical and optical chemical sensors and biosensors, lab-on-a-chip, sensor applications in environmental, clinical, food quality and process monitoring, development of fully autonomous sensing devices, wireless sensors and sensor networks. He is particularly interested in the using analytical devices and sensors as information providers for wireless networked systems i.e. building a continuum between the digital and molecular worlds.

Research Centres: NCSR, INSIGHT

Recent publications:

 


Brian Kelleher (Associate Professor)


Lecturer, School of Chemical Sciences, DCU. Feb. 2004 to July 2005; Postdoc. With Dr Andre Simpson, Dept. of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto. Set-up and method development of advanced analytical hyphenated methods: Liquid Chromatography (LC) - Mass Spectroscopy (MS)-Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). July 2002- Feb. 2004; Postdoctoral Researcher with Prof. William Kingery, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Mississippi State University. Catalytic activity of enzymes immobilised on organo-minerals. Characterisation of organic/inorganic component of deep-sea sediments associated with gas hydrates. Feb. 2001-July 2002; Project Manager for an EPA (Ireland) funded research project that resulted in a successful demonstration of the fluidised bed combustion of animal waste to produce heat and electricity. 1997-2001: PhD. Dr Tom O'Dwyer, development of sorbents for organic compounds, University of Limerick.

Research Centres: NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Mary Pryce (Associate Professor)

Bio: BSc. degree from DCU in 1991. A PhD (1991-1994) was subsequently obtained in organometallic photochemistry. Post doctoral studies were carried out during 1995 and 1996 at the University of Milan with Prof. Stefano Maiorana before rejoining the School of Chemical Sciences at DCU in 1997 as a Lecturer.

Affiliated groups: NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Blánaid White (Assistant Professor)


 

Dr. Whites research interests focus on the development of intelligent analysis tools and the application of analytical chemistry for the investigation of chemical and biochemical processes in the world around us.

A primary focus of her research is the elucidation of molecular mechanisms which initiate and propagate oxidative stress, particularly that which leads to DNA damage. This type of damage has been linked to mutagenesis, neurological disease and aging, and understanding the underlying mechanisms has the potential to enable us to develop tailored therapies to combat these diseases.

A further research focus is the development of analytical platforms. She coordinates the Interreg-funded project  Monitool , which seeks to develop new tools for monitoring the chemical status in transitional and coastal waters under the Water Framework Directive.

Dr. White also researches unique bioactive and nutrition profiles in Irish food. She is currently exploring the bioactive profiles for Irish honeys from across the island, investigating both honeybee and bumblebee honey and is a founding member of the Irish Bee and Pesticide Network.

Dr. White hasve worked extensively with industry, with previous research projects in collaboration with Allergan Ltd., Pfizer Ltd. and Proctor and Gamble Ltd. My Her group has ongoing research projects with Alltech (Ireland) in the area of oxidative DNA damage.

Research Centres: NCSR, DCU Water Institute

Recent publications:

 

 

Emma Coyle (Assistant Professor)


Emma Coyle is an Assistant Professor in organic and medicinal chemistry in the School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University (DCU), since 2014.

Dr. Coyle received her BSc in Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences and PhD in Organic Photochemistry from DCU. She then joined the School of Chemistry in the University of Nottingham as a research fellow in the groups of Prof. Rob Stockman and Dr Ross Denton, in collaboration with Prof. Sean Rigby in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering. In 2011, she re-joined DCU as a postdoctoral researcher in the group of Dr Chris O’Brien in the National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR). Throughout these experiences she focused on research in organic synthesis, in particular development of novel methodologies or green routes to high-value molecules.

Research Centres: NCSR

Recent publications:

 

 

Mercedes Vasquez (Assistant Professor)


Mercedes Vázquez is Assistant Professor in Analytical Chemistry at the School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University (DCU), since 2014. She is also a principal investigator at the National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), DCU. She received her MSc in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Oviedo (Spain) in 1998. In 1999, she joined the Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry at Åbo Akademi University (Turku, Finland) as an ERASMUS exchange student, where she continued till obtaining her PhD from Åbo Akademi in 2005. During this period, she worked on the development of potentiometric ion sensors based on conducting polymers for various applications such as chemical process control and clinical analysis. In 2006, she took up a postdoctoral position within the Centre for Bioanalytical Sciences (CBAS) at DCU, where she primarily focused on the development of analytical methods and technologies for the rapid screening of very complex media in biopharmaceutical processes. She then joined the Irish Separation Science Cluster (ISSC), DCU, in 2009, where she coordinated a research program focused on the development of novel microfluidic platforms for a wide range of (bio)analytical applications, including biotechnology and environmental analysis.

Research Centres: NCSR, APT

Recent publications:

 

James Walsh (SFI Starting Investigator)

Jamie is a materials scientist with extensive expertise with materials for energy conversion. His research interests include small molecule photo- and electrocatalytic transformations for solar fuel synthesis (CO2 reduction and water splitting), 2D materials, polymers, polyoxometalates and in-situ analysis using spectroelectrochemistry.

After a BSc and PhD in DCU, Jamie undertook postdoctoral positions at the Queen's University, Belfast, and the University of Liverpool. In October 2016 Jamie returned to DCU to establish his independent research group when made PI of a highly prestigious SFI SIRG fellowship.

Jamie has published multiple articles in high quality peer reviewed journals, delivered presentations at national and international conferences, and has reviewed extensively for the RSC, ACS and NPG. He is a member of the RSC and the ISE.

Oct 2016 - present: SFI SIRG fellow, DCU, CO2 reduction/ionic liquids/2D materials

June 2013 - Sept 2016: Postdoc, UoL, CO2 reduction/electrocatalysis/energy generation in soft materials

April 2013 - April 2014: Postdoc, QUB, photochemical/photoelectrochemical water splitting

July 2011 - April 2012: Postdoc, DCU, biospectroscopy

Oct 2007 - June 2011: PhD, DCU, physical chemistry/inorganic chemistry/polyoxometalates/dye photochemistry

Sept 2003 - June 2007: BSc 1.1 Hons, Chemical & Pharmaceutical Sciences, DCU

 

Research Centres: NCSR

Recent publications:

Photochemical CO2 reduction using structurally controlled g-C3N4

Controlling Visible Light Driven Photoconductivity in Self-Assembled Perylene Bisimide Structures

A highly active nickel electrocatalyst shows excellent selectivity for CO2 reduction in acidic media

 

Nessan Kerrigan (Assistant Professor)

Dr. Kerrigan obtained his B.Sc. in Chemistry from University College Dublin (1992-1996).  He then completed his Ph.D. in Chemistry at University College Dublin (1996-2000) under the direction of Professor Declan G. Gilheany.  He spent a year in industry working as a process development chemist for Merck in Ballydine before carrying out postdoctoral research at the University of Glasgow (2002-2004) with Professor David J. Procter.  He carried out further postdoctoral research at the University of Pittsburgh (2004-2006) with Prof. Scott G. Nelson.  In 2006 Dr. Kerrigan began his independent research career at Oakland University in Michigan.  In August 2017, Dr. Kerrigan returned to Ireland to take up a position as Lecturer in the School of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University.  The Kerrigan group carries out research in the area of synthetic organic chemistry.  Most of the group’s work is of the basic/fundamental chemistry research kind and is focused on the development of new efficient methods for the construction of biologically interesting and pharmaceutically important organic molecules.



 

Science Education

Odilla Finlayson (Associate Professor)

Odilla Finlayson is an Associate Professor in Science Education in the School of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University (DCU). She was a recipient of the Teaching Fellowship in 2001 and the DCU President‘s Award for Teaching and Learning in 2007. She has served on the Education Council of the professional bodies RSC (Royal Society of Chemistry) and ICI (Institute of Chemistry of Ireland) in several capacities and remains active on these bodies. She is involved in selection and training of the Irish teams for participation in the Olympiads IIJSO, EUSO and IChO and is the Country Co-ordinator for EUSO.

Research Centres: CASTeL

Recent publications:

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

For informal discussions on post-graduate opportunities in the School, please contact the Research Convenor, Dr. Aoife Morrin.