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Centre For Interreligious Dialogue

interfaith charter

Dublin City Interfaith Charter

The Dublin City Interfaith Charter was launched on December 20, 2016 at the Mansion House in Dublin (https://www.dublincityinterfaithforum.org/cmsfiles/resources/19202_DCCo_A3_CitizenCharter_V5-page-001.jpg). The charter was the work of the Dublin City Interfaith Forum and the Lord Mayor of Dublin, Brendan Carr. The event was a great success and testified not only to the growing religious diversity in our city and country but in the awareness of the work needed to be done for greater partnership and dialogue among those of various faiths  or atheist positions (http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/religion-and-beliefs/dublin-city-interfaith-charter-signed-for-all-religions-in-the-city-1.2913539)

In a moving speech, the Lord Mayor of Dublin challenged those signing the document only to do so if they were going to act on it within their communities. He also called upon every community to consider taking in one Syrian refugee family and to provide adequate housing and education for two years to help them fully integrate into Irish society. The charter was then read by a number of school children of various faith and ethnic backgrounds. Following the formal signing, invited delegates were encouraged to offer their thoughts and views. Dr Peter Admirand, representing the CIRD, first praised the children for their role in the event, reminding all participants that we are doing such work for them and for a better future. He then praised the document and the work of the Dublin City Interfaith Forum and suggested that if one key word could be added to the document, it would be to the final line, which states: “to create social conditions that will allow all to share peace, joy, and hope.” Addressing the room, Dr Admirand said that word would be ‘economic’. Without just pay, affordable rent and living conditions, immigrants and other vulnerable groups are pushed to the margins where schools, health care, and other basic necessities limit their full participation and flourishing within Irish society. To truly welcome such individuals, we need to make sure access to good schools, solid health care, a just wage, and affordable rent are available to all.  


21st December, 2016
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