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School of Human Development

Assist. Prof Amalee Meehan

Human Development

Name: Assist. Prof Amalee Meehan
Department: Human Development
Role: Academic Staff
Phone Number: 01 884 2322
Email Address: amalee.meehan@dcu.ie
Room: SPC M 107
Campus: DCU St Patricks Campus

Biographical Details

Amalee joined DCU in 2017 as Assistant Professor of Religious Education in the School of Human Development. An Associate Researcher at the National Anti-Bullying Research and Resource Centre (ABC) at DCU, Amalee is on the management team of the COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) project TRIBES Transnational Collaboration on Bullying, Migration and Integration in Second-Level Schools.

Before joining DCU, Amalee was an executive member of CEIST (Catholic Education, an Irish Schools Trust), exercising the trustee role and providing counsel to schools in areas of leadership and management. She continues to work with the Irish Jesuit Province as a member of the Board of Management of Crescent College Comprehensive SJ.

Amalee holds a PhD in Theology and Education from Boston College, USA and a Master of Education from Trinity College, University of Dublin. She is a member of the Religious Education Association, an international Association of Professors, Practitioners, and Researchers in Religious Education.


With a research background in wellbeing and spirituality, Amalee’s research priorities are rooted in the areas of
a) Teacher Education and Wellbeing, with a focus on sustaining the educator.  Her Joining the Dots: A programme of spiritual reflection and renewal for educators (2012), was written to reflect the reality of the changing landscape and complex role of the educator in Irish schools.
b) Curriculum and Pedagogy: Amalee has co-authored 3 textbooks for the Credo series – a Religious Education programme for US Catholic High Schools and has led teams of RE teachers to create and provide curricular resources and in-service for the Irish post-primary context.