Dr
Seán
Jordan

Primary Department
School of Chemical Sciences
Role
Academic Staff - Environmental Chemistry
Sean
Phone number: 01 700
6709
Campus
Glasnevin Campus
Room Number
X123

Academic biography

Seán Jordan is Assistant Professor in Chemistry in the School of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University (DCU), Ireland. He obtained his BSc (Hons) in Environmental Science from DCU in 2009. Following this he gained practical experience as a research assistant in the National Centre for Sensor Research. In 2012, after a short time in Australia, he returned to DCU to complete his PhD in Biogeochemistry which was awarded in 2016. That same year he accepted a position as Postdoctoral Research Associate at University College London, investigating the first cell membranes at the origin of life. In 2021 he secured a ‘la Caixa’ Foundation Postdoctoral Junior Leader Fellowship (Marie Skłodowska-Curie COFUND) to pursue his work on protocells, organic biomorphs, and biosignature detection at Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon, Portugal. He is currently a member of the Life Science Institute in DCU and the Origin of Life Early-career Network (OoLEN). He is fascinated by the transition from geochemistry to biochemistry eventually leading to the origin and evolution of life, and how we can trace these events through a combination of experimentation and advanced analytical techniques. His research group in DCU, the ProtoSigns Lab, is focused on pushing the boundaries of membrane formation at the origin of life, investigating how the resulting structures may be preserved in the rock record, and the potential effects this may have on our interpretation of biosignatures from the early Earth and elsewhere in our Solar System.

Research interests

The origin of life on Earth

The formation and evolution of protocell membranes

The formation and evolution of metal clusters and protoenzymes

The evolution of early life

The existence of life on other planetary bodies

Development of novel biosignatures and methodology for determining

biogenicity

Palaeoclimate reconstruction and the development of novel biogeochemical

proxies

Development of novel materials